Danielle Keeler

think about it.

The reality of being fake

with 5 comments

So today I saw a post on Tumblr (future reference: a lot of my topics will come from Tumblr), and it got me thinking.  As a writer, I can relate to this. I cannot embed the post in this blog (I probably can, I just don’t know how), but here is the dialogue from it:

“You’re willing to have it published and read by strangers, but you don’t want your best friend to see it?”

“Thank you for understanding.”

That’s it: short and brief, but for some reason true.  Writers are very private individuals, and they generally prefer to keep most of their writing separate from their personal life.  I then launched into a very lengthy self-analysis, and here is what I have come up with:

Writers are, for the most part, extremely self-conscious.  Not in the aspect that they are insecure, but more in the aspect that they immediately feel vulnerable once their writing is out in the open.  To most writers, allowing strangers to read their work does not seem real, and therefore they feel more comfortable putting it out in a society that does not know them.  From personal experience, I know it is much easier to read a comment from someone you have never met who does not like your work, than it is to have your best friend tell you that it sounds like you’re trying too hard.

After the above realization, I immediately noticed something else: writers are fake.  Even the person who prides them self most on being real (which I will confess is sometimes me) proves them self to be fake when they only allow certain groups of people to see certain parts of them.  I am guilty of this, as is every other person in society–writers are no longer the sole focus.  Most people just try to pretend it’s not true; they try to pretend that they are consistent and honest with everyone.  Final epiphany: NO ONE IS REAL.  Everyone filters their personality to match their surroundings, and it makes me wonder…who can you really trust?  Can you even trust yourself?

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Written by Danielle Keeler

July 28, 2011 at 6:02 am

Posted in Being real, Writers

5 Responses

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  1. I agree, everyone is fake, my whole angle is that I am uncomfortably real and even I filter myself from swearing or saying things that I really believe because I am afraid it will alienate people.

    theflashion

    July 27, 2011 at 11:11 pm

  2. so true! I think its also because when you write, you are baring a part of your soul. Its easier to have someone you dont know reject it rather than have some one you know and are close to do that.

    magpietimes

    July 28, 2011 at 12:28 am

  3. After the above realization, I immediately noticed something else: writers are fake. Even the person who prides them self most on being real (which I will confess is sometimes me) proves them self to be fake when they only allow certain groups of people to see certain parts of them. I am guilty of this, as is every other person in society–writers are no longer the sole focus. Most people just try to pretend it’s not true; they try to pretend that they are consistent and honest with everyone.

    I agree to a certain extent, but one thing that sets great writers apart from good writers is vulnerability in their writing. You are correct that once you let a work fly, it can be a roller coaster. That each negative comment feels a bit like an assault. But that’s not a bad thing, in and of itself. Part of my writing arsenal is a debate style of blogging that I want people to argue over. If you can defend your position with facts, you’re more likely to get closer to the truth.

    And it depends on what kind of writers you’re talking about. Bloggers? Fiction writers? Journalists? They all have different motivations for writing. Bill Hicks said:

    “I want my children listening to people who fucking rocked! I don’t care if they died in pools of their own vomit! I want someone who plays from his fucking heart!”

    The writers/poets/songwriters that move people most are the ones that “play from the heart”. They expose vulnerable sides to themselves. Do they hide parts of themselves? Sure. That’s a smart/wise/safe thing to do. Just keep in mind that most people hide all of themselves. No one is perfect. But writing is a good way to learn and explore and test your own thoughts.

    Everyone filters their personality to match their surroundings, and it makes me wonder…who can you really trust? Can you even trust yourself?

    As long as you’re being as honest as you can be in your writing, I think you can trust yourself. But it’s not a static process. The more you write, the more honest you will feel with yourself and in turn the more you will learn. Writing is kind of like life that way….

    Martha Abernathy

    July 28, 2011 at 11:00 am

    • You make some good points here, I’m glad to see all the detail you thought about (different kinds of writers, etc.). I agree with you completely in the aspect that those writers who make themselves the most vulnerable are the ones who produce the best writing. And this comment made my day, because it proves that someone out there actually thinks about things, so thank you for that!

      Danielle Keeler

      July 28, 2011 at 11:12 am


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